Duke Medical Center Archives
Category: News

MaryAnn Black

Remembering MaryAnn E. Black
Posted On: March 27, 2020 by Rebecca Williams

The Duke Community was saddened to learn of the passing of MaryAnn E. Black yesterday. She leaves behind an extraordinary legacy of leadership and service to the Durham and Duke communities. Across her various positions as social worker, Durham County Commissioner, and State Representative, MaryAnn Black continuously sought to promote the health and human service needs of all Durham residents.    Upon hearing the news of her passing, we returned to an oral history interview conducted with Ms. Black to hear her insights. Her remarkable dedication to public service and gifts of cultivating partnerships is apparent throughout the interview. When talking about breaking down barriers in healthcare, she noted the importance of diverse hiring practices and avenues for progress:     “Breaking... MORE

Category: News, Collection Spotlight

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info alert

Digital Research Resources
Posted On: March 25, 2020 by Rebecca Williams

As of Friday, March 13 at 5pm, the Duke University Medical Center Archives is closed to the public until further notice due to COVID-19. Staff are working remotely and are available for consultation via our online request form or via email. We cannot access our physical collections, but we are happy to answer general questions and assist you in locating digital materials for your research if possible.

Below are some available online resources:

MEDSpace – If you’re looking for historic images, our digital repository, MEDSpace, is an excellent place to start. MEDSpace contains nearly 700 photographs documenting the history of Duke Medicine. You can also find early publications, medical illustrations and artwork,...

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We are excited to announce the installation of a new exhibit on Level 3 of the Medical Center Library. “A Medical Student’s Life at Duke in 1930” explores the lives of Duke’s first medical students, 30 first-year and 18 third-year medical students who were admitted to the new medical school in the fall of 1930.    According to the 1930-1931 School of Medicine Bulletin, the estimated yearly cost of attendance for students was between $295 and $315. Each year the school offered four terms of eleven weeks, commencing October 1st with one-week vacations in December, March, and June and a one-month vacation in September. Students were required to complete three terms... MORE

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George L. Maddox Papers

George L. Maddox Papers
Posted On: February 17, 2020 by Rebecca Williams

The Medical Center Archives is happy to announce that new additions to the George L. Maddox Papers are open for research. This collection contains the personal and professional papers of George L. Maddox, a former director of the Duke University Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development.

Over the course of his career, Maddox was a major figure in the push to improve health care and the quality of life for older adults in the United States. While at Duke, he was not only the director of the Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, but also the program director for the Center’s Long Term Care Resources Program (LTRCP). This program was focused on providing...

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RESCHEDULED:
Wednesday, February 26, 2020

4:30pm - 6:00pm
The Chappell Family Gallery (Perkins Library)
West Campus Remarks at 5:00 p.m. in the Holsti-Anderson Family Assembly Room (Rubenstein Library 153, next door to the Chappell Family Gallery).    Help us celebrate the opening of the new exhibit in the Chappell Family Gallery.   Seeing the Invisible explores the history of protein visualization by following the contributions of Duke biochemistry professors Dave and Jane Richardson, who have spent over five decades researching these molecular building blocks of life and finding ways to help both scientists and other people better understand and appreciate their structures.   Through... MORE

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The Duke University Medical Center Archives (DUMCA) is excited to announce the acquisition of the Onyekwere E. Akwari Papers, a collection that documents the personal life and professional career of Dr. Onyekwere E. Akwari, a Nigerian-American and the first African-American surgeon at Duke University.   Dr. Akwari was the son of Theophilus Akwari, an export-import business owner, and Ngarasi Christiana Ukegbu, the owner and operator of numerous local shops. He was raised in Abia State, Nigeria as the oldest of eight children. In 1962, shortly after Nigeria declared its independence from British rule, Akwari made the decision to leave his home country and travel to the United States... MORE

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“Archives—it’s where technology comes to die” is a phrase I frequently use when discussing obsolete audiovisual formats in archives. Think about it, when is the last time you shoved a VHS tape into your VCR, a Betamax into your Betamax player, or a U-Matic into its player? Have you fired up your wire recorder recently? Threaded a film into your 16mm or 8mm projector? How about a DVD? Do you watch those anymore? Listened to any audiocassette tapes or CDs recently? What about a reel-to-reel audio tape? Even if you haven’t, these formats still exist. Often the only copy of a recording is on an obsolete format, which is why archival repositories that collect these obsolete formats, also need to collect obsolete format players.   ... MORE

Category: News, Ask The Archives

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For All the People: A Century of Citizen Action in Health Care Reform Medical Center Library & Archives - Level 1 On Display Now   The Medical Center Library is hosting “For All the People: A Century of Citizen Action in Health Care Reform,” a six-banner traveling exhibition. Developed and produced by the National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health, it explores changes to the American health care system and highlights the work of citizens to instigate change.    In conjunction with the NLM display, the Medical Center Library and Archives produced a companion exhibit featuring photographs of Duke Health community members and their involvement in local civic efforts. 

 

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Documenting Durham’s Health History  Medical Center Library & Archives – Level 2R, Room 212E, and Level 3  On Display November 21-December 13   Through maps, images, and video interviews, this exhibition examines the roots of health disparities in the "City of Medicine." It highlights four sequential case studies: tuberculosis before WWII, childbirth during hospital desegregation in the 1960s, HIV/AIDS epidemic in the 1980-90s, and the more recent rise of type 2 diabetes. The exhibit looks at each case study from multiple vantage points. While racial disparities characterize all four examples, each one illustrates how race intersects... MORE

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Rhizopuspepsin domain 1

Jane and David Richardson Papers
Posted On: November 11, 2019 by Rebecca Williams

The Archives is happy to announce they are now home to the Jane and David Richardson Papers. Both Jane and David are currently professors in Duke’s Department of Biochemistry. Jane is James B. Duke professor of Biochemistry and David is professor of Biochemistry and founding director of Duke’s Structural Biology and Biophysics Graduate Training Program. The Richardson’s met while students at Swarthmore College. Following graduation, they married and David continued his studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, pursing a PhD in chemistry while working in the laboratory of Albert F. Cotton and researching small molecule inorganic chemistry and crystallography. Meanwhile, Jane attended Harvard... MORE

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Bell building

October is Archives Month
Posted On: October 25, 2019 by Rebecca Williams

Archives Month is an annual, month-long observance of the agencies and people responsible for maintaining and making available the archival and historical records of our nation, state, communities, and people. Archives serve as the memory of our nation, and by celebrating, we recognize and give legitimacy to the enduring value of American records and America’s archives.

There are several ways to celebrate this month and learn more about the work of archives. The first is through social media. On October 2, 2019, archivists around the country took to Twitter to respond to questions tweeted with the hashtag #AskAnArchivist. From our Twitter account we provided...

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Location: Medical Center Library & Archives, Level 2, Room 212E

Date: Thursday, October 31, 11am – 2pm

The Duke University Medical Center Archives is hosting its sixth annual Halloween event featuring a selection of odd, intriguing, and rarely seen materials from their collections.

All are invited to drop in to view detailed medical illustrations, touch old medical instruments, explore forgotten stories from the history of Duke Health, and much more.

Come by for a fun break with free Halloween candy!

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The Duke Community was saddened to learn of the passing of Dr. Wolfgang K. Joklik earlier this month. As both Chair of the Duke Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology and co-founder of the Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, he had a profound impact on Duke Health. 

There have been several well-written tributes to Dr. Joklik and his legacy in the past couple of weeks, so rather than attempt to write another, we thought that we would share some of his own words. We conducted an oral history interview with Dr. Joklik in 2007 that hopefully provides some insight on the passion that guided much of his work.

When describing his dedication to Duke and the Cancer Center, Dr. Joklik shared the following:

“In 1968 I was recruited to become Chairman of the...

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The Duke University Medical Center Archives is happy to announce that the Duke Faculty Wives Records are processed and open for research. The collection contains materials documenting the Duke Medical Faculty Wives and their running of the Nearly New Shoppe as a means to raise money for scholarships to the Duke University School of Medicine and the Duke University School of Nursing. Types of materials include administrative records, by-laws, financial records, roosters, photo albums, scrapbooks, photographs, clippings, invitations, architectural plans, and digital files. Materials date from 1968-2018. 

This collection documents the Duke...

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The Computerized Textbook of Medicine: The development of computer technology and medical databases at Duke Medicine 

Medical Center Library & Archives – Level 1

On Display Now

Today it is hard to remember a world without computers, but their value in medicine was not always apparent. As with any new technology, widespread adoption takes time. 

Duke University Medical Center has played a crucial role in the development of data science techniques and innovations in medicine and clinical research since the 1960s. This is most clearly evident in the development of the Duke Databank for Cardiovascular Disease, but early data science efforts also played a critical role in other...

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